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Libya : Understanding the conflict


Lybia is not about a revolution for freedoms or a fight against any substantial change against a status quo that far from the norm experienced by the rest of the planet. Yes, Libya is run by a dictator. But if you looked at the daily lives, rights, and responsibilities of citizens in Libya compared to any other country in the region, or even Europe or the United States, you will find that the similarities out number the differences.

No, the war in Libya is about jobs and corporate profitability. If you take a look at the beginning of the unrest, you will find that it all started with violence by Libyans against “imported workers” from China and the Philippines. The unrest, fueled by the unrest in the region, was directed at getting back jobs that were given to cheaper foreign workers who were imported for oil jobs.

When those demanding a change, and demanding jobs, organized, the initial rebel force looked much like a new “union”.

The news did not cover this genesis of this war. The news only covered the beginning engagement of organized forces against Gaddafi. Once there was a chance for a regime change, then the corporations of the world became interested. The war provided opportunities.

1) Immediate opportunities to supply rebels with goods
2) Investment opportunities to capture business once Gaddafi was ousted.
3) Opportunities to win contracts to rebuild Libya after the war ended.

The next increase in news coverage and international interest happened when the United Nations officially intervened with the “no fly zone” policy and the upcoming “Gaddafi must go” decision. What this really means is that large corporations are now seeing the opportunity and moving to capitalize on these opportunities.

1) Political contracts to rebuild heavily damaged cities
2) Control of the oil flow (BP will get this one as they are the most connected in the United Nations)
3) New telecommunications services. (You will notice that they are summarily destroying communications centers)
3) Western style retail to come soon after the end of the war.

Libya is not in a conflict for ideology. Libya is in conflict for corporate investment. The best way to look at this war is to consider it as a hostile takeover of a large corporation. Take a look at the pictures below and it will give you a new way of looking at the war.

Union Hall in Libya

Job seekers fighting for a new job

These are not soldiers. These are people who are looking to secure their future. They have been promised that if they win, they will be “rich”. They will have great jobs and political power. We know better than this, but to a person who has seen their job being taken by a foreign worker, this is their only way to insure that they, and their children, will have jobs.

resume

Libyan Resume

Libyan Job Training

Not all interviews go well.

Failed Libyan Job Interview

You need to look at the combatants as job seekers. They are the ones who will have jobs if the rebels win. The rebels are seeking a “hostile takeover” of the company known as Libya. Libya has excellent revenues and high profitability. These people are part of the takeover company. Until the United Nations stepped in, these rebels were supported only by “angel investments” by small corporations. Now with the official actions of the United Nations, they know that they have the financial backing of large oil corporations, military support corporations, and engineering corporations that make their money in regime changes.

With every hostile takeover, there are losers. With a change in management, old management is summarily removed from office. Most of these managers have had a comfortable life and the thought of being in the unemployment lines makes them angry. You can see it on their faces.

Libyan managers know they will lose their jobs

Executive officer who will soon lose his position in Libya

In a world where corporate interests now dictate war, we as individuals are powerless to make any changes. Even President Obama has become a corporate spokesman and avid supporter of hostile takeovers. Now is the time to look at the conflicts with an eye of truth. These are business dealings. There is no more moralistic triumphs or liberal agendas. This is all about money. This is all about control of dwindling natural resources.

What we see here today is the start of our future. As resources become more scarce and valuable. I have no love for the Gaddafi regime. I do however see past the hypocrisy of the west and understand that he is no different from the political action committees in the United States. He is just a corporation that showed weakness and has become a takeover target for western corporations. The rebels in Libya are just ignorant people who are fighting for promises made to them that will never be kept.

Itia (abroad)

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  1. bb
    March 22, 2011 at 12:16 pm

    THIS IS VERY PAINFUL TRUTH. AFRICA HAS LOST IT ALL THANKS TO OPPORTUNISTS WHO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF EXISTING MULADMINISTRATIONS AND DICTATORSHIPS TO PROP UP THEIR UNPATRIOTIC GREEDINESS AND ENDEVOURS TO GET RICH AT THE EXPENSE OF AFRICAN HERITAGE. REST IN PEACE AFRICAN RENNAISCENCE, LONG LIVE AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN RECOLONISATION OF AFRICA BY IMPOSITION OF UNPRINCIPLED HALF BACKED IGNORANT POWER MONGERS WHO WILL SELL THEIR HERITAGE TO INVADERS IN THE NAME OF DEMOCRACY.
    AFRICA FORGET ! YOU HAVE LOST IT!! TWICE IN ONE CENTURY!!

  2. Hadassa Guia
    April 24, 2011 at 8:07 am

    I am brasilian and I can’t realise that is the truth.
    How can the World do that?? How can the countries enjoy the war and after explore Lybia??
    Capitalism must change or will be over.
    How I hate it all….

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